Dr. Jerome H. Rosenstein

Call: 518.725.8621

Dear Patients, Thank you for allowing me to be your physician in these last several years. It is with a heavy heart that I close my practice and take a new position in Central New York. It is an opportunity for me and my family that will allow us more family time and security in this changing health care climate.

I am referring my patients to the Women's OB/GYN Associates practice of Drs. Carol Miller and Marianne (Shantillo) Davis. Their address is 401 Main Street, Johnson City, New York 13790 and their phone number is 607-754-9870 They will retain my practice records after September 17, 2017. Please feel free to call our office with any questions at 518-725-8621.

Wishing all of you good health and much happiness.

Welcome
New
Patients

Please read the Press and Sun Guest Viewpoint article by Christie Finch, Director of Perinatal Services for the Mothers & Babies Perinatal Services regarding our breast feeding support to our patients!

Decrease text size Increase text size Increase text size

Drinking Coffee Daily Not a Risk Factor for Miscarriage or Premature Birth

Drinking coffee won’t adversely affect or cause complications during pregnancy, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists revealed, debunking several reports that claim caffeine’s life-threatening effects on the fetus.

“I think it’s time to comfortably say that it’s okay to have a cup of coffee during pregnancy,” ACOG’s Committee on Obstetric Practice chairperson Dr. William Barth told Reuters Health.

The Committee has reported that a daily dose of 200 mg of caffeine is considered “moderate caffeine consumption” and will not significantly contribute to the risk of miscarriage or premature birth. That quantity amounts to a 12-ounce cup of coffee. Moreover, the committee also deemed safe the consumption of about four eight-ounce cups of tea, five 12-ounce cans of soda or consuming seven dark chocolate bars every day.

However, the committee did not clarify if consuming over 200 mg of caffeine every day would contribute as a risk factor for miscarriage or premature birth.

Dr. Barth and his colleagues considered two studies in coming up with the committee’s opinion. The first study was led by Dr. David Savitz of Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York while the second was conducted by Dr. De-Kun Li and his colleagues from Kaiser Permanente’s Division of Research in Oakland.

In the Dr. Savitz-led study, there was no increased risk of miscarriage in women who consumed high amounts of caffeine during pregnancy. The Kaiser Permanente study, however, found increased risk of miscarriage in women who consumed over 200 mg of caffeine daily. But both studies revealed that moderate consumption of caffeine daily will not result in premature birth.

Archive