Dr. Jerome H. Rosenstein

Call: 518.725.8621

Dear Patients, Thank you for allowing me to be your physician in these last several years. It is with a heavy heart that I close my practice and take a new position in Central New York. It is an opportunity for me and my family that will allow us more family time and security in this changing health care climate.

I am referring my patients to the Women's OB/GYN Associates practice of Drs. Carol Miller and Marianne (Shantillo) Davis. Their address is 401 Main Street, Johnson City, New York 13790 and their phone number is 607-754-9870 They will retain my practice records after September 17, 2017. Please feel free to call our office with any questions at 518-725-8621.

Wishing all of you good health and much happiness.

Welcome
New
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Please read the Press and Sun Guest Viewpoint article by Christie Finch, Director of Perinatal Services for the Mothers & Babies Perinatal Services regarding our breast feeding support to our patients!

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What You Need to Know about Endometriosis

Yahoo! Health has reported the case of Senie Byrne’s condition. The 25-year-old woman from Manassas, Virginia was 15 then when her menstrual periods were accompanied by cramps and vomiting. In most instances, she would pass out because of the pain that came along with her monthly periods. She consulted several doctors regarding her condition until she finally found out what she had—endometriosis.

Endometriosis is a uterine disease that takes a long time to diagnose. This medical condition involves the inner lining of the woman’s reproductive system. Here, the mucous membrane, which is supposed to grow inside the uterus, is found in other areas of the body. It is usually found in the ovaries, bowel, bladder or at the back of the uterus. In rare instances, endometrial cells are also found in the lungs.

Women are supposed to shed this uterine lining during their monthly periods. But with endometriosis, the lining gets stuck, disrupting the normal cycles and leading to pain, inflammation or bleeding during menstrual periods.

According to Dr. Tommaso Falcone of The Cleveland Clinic, endometriosis can also cause killer cramps, diarrhea, constipation or pain and discomfort during sex. At times, there is no pain at all.

Dr. Mary Jane Minkin of Yale University School of Medicine adds, “The peculiar thing is that the amount of pain you’re in may have no correlation to the amount of endometriosis you have.”

Indeed, “no pain” doesn’t really equate to “no problem.” The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists reported that around 38 percent of women blame endometriosis for their infertility because the condition often causes scarring and inflammation or otherwise prevents the interaction of the egg and the sperm.

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